Redox Extends Capabilities of Salesforce Health Cloud with Patient Data from Electronic Medical Records

Redox has announced it is extending the capabilities of Salesforce Health Cloud with its EMR integration engine.

Redox provides a modern API solution for clinical integration with electronic medical record (EMR) systems. The addition of Redox to the Health Cloud product provides streamlined sharing of clinical data and a comprehensive view of patient conditions and clinical events. Health Cloud is generally available for purchase today, giving healthcare providers new ways to make smarter care decisions, engage with patients across their caregiver networks and manage patient data. Redox joins Salesforce as a Health Cloud launch partner at the Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society (HIMSS16) Conference in Las Vegas.

“We are devoted to accelerating the adoption of great technology in healthcare. We believe Salesforce Health Cloud represents a great step for the industry and look forward to helping the solution positively impact the maximum number of lives,” said Niko Skievaski, Co-founder & President, Redox. “Health Cloud brings together data from many sources and presents a comprehensive view of the patient. Accessing data from the electronic medical record real-time through a modern infrastructure is an integral piece of this puzzle and we are proud to partner with Salesforce to deliver robust EMR integrations.”

“We live in the age of the customer, and patients now expect personalized and engaging experiences with their healthcare providers,” said Joshua Newman, MD, Chief Medical Officer, GM, Salesforce Healthcare and Life Sciences. “Health Cloud is all about building stronger patient relationships, and Redox is a valuable part of our journey towards creating a modern healthcare platform for patients, doctors, and everyone else involved in care.”

Redox Key Features

Redox integrates with electronic medical records and standardizes disparate data formats to consistent JSON data models. Partners establish connectivity with Redox once and are then able to send and receive data with any health system or digital health application through a modern web service API. Redox provides robust maintenance and support of connections ensuring data flows appropriately and allows organizations to focus on core functions.

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A Proposal To Increase EHR Satisfaction Using Education

A recent study presented at the 2013 HIMSS conference revealed through the survey of 4,279 clinicians that EHR satisfaction has declined from 39% in 2010 to 27% in 2012.

While many organizations and publications have speculated about what has caused the decrease in satisfaction, I’d like to suggest we dedicate our resources to solving the problem instead of simply discussing the causes. Like so many transitions in the past, I wonder if the solution could simply be a matter of education? The study cited that the number of clinicians using EHRs who claimed to be “very dissatisfied” increased by 10% during those two years. This begs the question, are all users dissatisfied with their specific program, or may the dissatisfaction be caused by change itself? After all, physicians and nurses are being forced to change a long standing practice of paper charting.

According to the Pew Research Center’s Internet and American Life Project 20% of Americans did not use the internet and 13% did not have access to a computer in 2010. Outside of those numbers there are many medical professionals who are simply uncomfortable with computers or do not have strong typing skills. If a nurse is learning how to navigate a keyboard while simultaneously having to learn a system, it’s not surprising that he or she may be dissatisfied with the change. The disruption in workflow could be greatly improved by teaching nurses and doctors how to integrate EHRs into their daily tasks while still in the classroom.

Academic electronic health records programs, like EHR Tutor, allow students to gain exposure to EHRs before entering the workplace. Learning how to use electronic charting while still learning how to do the basics of their job, teaches students to be just as comfortable with a computer as they would be with a pen and piece of paper. This is something that may help ease the transition to electronic charting in the future.

In addition to being generally dissatisfied, the number of users dissatisfied with the “features and functionality” of their EHR system increased from 51% to 61%. One pain point seemed to be the fact that the features and functionality in many EHRs do not align well enough with clinicians’ workflow. Workflow can be determined by meetings with key stakeholders, shadowing medical personnel during their workday and conversations with designated doctor or nurse champions. The process works best when input from the people who will be using the system is carefully considered and fully utilized. However, improving workflows will not solve the entire problem.

For example, let us examine a problem like “alert fatigue”. In many systems, alerts pop up with warnings about drugs that may be unnecessary or elementary for a prescribing physician, or with a warning that a field is missing data that may not be relevant to the patient. An alert may also appear after a particular issue has been handled. While the alerts may seem logical to a programmer, they don’t necessarily make sense in the field. Thankfully, there are more and more schools offering courses on healthcare technology, which provide a foundation of knowledge for future developers and analysts.

Centers like the Training Hub for Operative Technologies in Healthcare at Imperial College in London offer full programs dedicated to healthcare technology. For current developers, Coursera.org offers free courses including “Health Informatics in the Cloud”, “Interprofessional Healthcare Informatics” and “Healthcare Innovation and Entrepreneurship”, all of which examine the real life work of medical professionals in relation to the technology they use. This is a knowledge set that is absolutely necessary for a programmer trying to design a system for those very people. By having companies sponsor those classes or conversations, we would open the lines of communication and enhance the education of program developers.

Along with a decrease in satisfaction regarding features and functionality, the amount of clinicians who said they would not purchase their current EHR system again if given the chance increased from 25% to 38%. This cannot be solely the fault of developers; some of the onus must fall on consumers themselves. Instead of hearing the lament, “If only I would have known…” after an EHR implementation, we can begin by making sure medical offices do know what they are getting with any particular system and what they should expect when shopping for an EHR. Educating consumers is imperative. For example, the level of computer skills and familiarity with technology needed when using different programs may be a huge factor for a practice with less computer savvy practitioners.

Reading the reviews on EHRCompare.com quickly revealed that AdvancedEMR can be difficult to set up and implement for less technologically inclined staff, whereas Practice Fusion seems to be less customizable, but easier to use (based on user reviews alone). Using EHRCompare to research multiple EHRs, a user can search by specialty, setting, and hosting preference. Then, all applicable EHRs will appear with an overview of features along with user reviews. That information not only gives consumers a great place to start, it teaches them what questions to ask and what to look for. What are some pain points a consumer may not have thought of? How do the program specs translate to office usage?

Another great resource is the Health IT government website which has a full list of all certified EHR systems: http://oncchpl.force.com/ehrcert/CHPLHome. It has a large checklist of features for each product, allowing consumers to see, at a glance, what is available and what is missing. That way, consumers know all the details even if the EHR sales rep did not disclose them all. Knowing what to look for can help buyers purchase the best system for their particular practice.

Overall, any change in procedure involves a long, arduous education process. While there are technical problems to overcome in the present, many problems can be prevented with simple education in the future. Using the resources available we can make sure new medical professionals, EHR programmers and consumers all have access to the best resources and knowledge base possible. This is something that can only lead to improvement.

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Sanford Health Recognized for Bringing Electronic Medical Records to Ghana

Sanford Health have announced that it ranked in the top 100 on this year’s InformationWeek 500 – a list of the top technology innovators in the U.S. The full list can be on http://www.informationweek.com/500.

Sanford Health was recognized this year because of the development and implementation of electronic medical records (EMRs) at its clinic locations in Ghana, Africa. Before the implementation of electronic medical records, existing processes were completely paper-based. The conversion to EMR reduced registration time and improved patient follow up.

“Bringing an EMR to these clinics immediately presented a multitude of technical and social challenges, and resolving these challenges required some creative efforts to assure success,” said Arlyn Broekhuis, Sanford Health’s chief information officer. “Intensive work and everyone’s willingness made this project an incredible success. While our team is grateful for this recognition, the real winners with the project are our patients in Ghana.”

In 2012, the first Sanford World Clinic opened in Cape Coast, Ghana and currently sees more than 1,300 patients per week. Throughout 2012, the second, third and fourth clinics opened in the communities of Kojokrom, Adenta and Mankessim. The fifth clinic in the community of Kasoa will open in fall 2013. At that time, Sanford World Clinics Ghana will employ nearly 150 individuals with the capacity to handle approximately 400,000 annual patient visits.

"The theme of this year's InformationWeek 500 is digital business. It's a movement, rooted in data analytics, mobile computing, social networking and other customer‐focused technologies that are turning companies and industries on their ear," said InformationWeek Editor In Chief Rob Preston. "Every enterprise is now a digital business — or needs to become one fast. The companies in our ranking are leading the way."

InformationWeek identifies and honors the nation's most innovative users of information technology with its annual InformationWeek 500 listing, and also tracks the technology, strategies, investments, and administrative practices of some of the best‐known organizations in the country. Unique among corporate rankings, the InformationWeek 500 spotlights the power of innovation in information technology.

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