Mission Health Selects PeraHealth To Enhance Clinical Surveillance, Patient Safety

Asheville, N.C.-based Mission will integrate PeraHealth’s suite of clinical surveillance solutions into its existing enterprise data warehouse and its Cerner electronic medical record (EMR) system, helping care teams visualize a full picture of patient condition. The software will also be used at the 763-bed Mission Hospital to remotely monitor patients and support bed management across the health system’s five other hospitals located throughout western North Carolina.

“Our partnership with PeraHealth further demonstrates our commitment to providing fully integrated patient care that improves the health of the people and communities we serve,” said Ronald A. Paulus, M.D., president and CEO at Mission, the only health system in the nation named to Truven Health Analytics’ Top 15 Health Systems list four years in a row (2012-2015).

Powered by the Rothman Index, a disease-agnostic measure of patient condition used to predict patient readmission and mortality risk, PeraHealth software pulls data from all major EMR systems. The data is automatically translated into an Index score that’s presented in color-coded graphs computed upon admission and trended across the entire episode of care. The Rothman Index is validated by 18 peer-reviewed publications, including a recent article detailing how its use by a nurse rapid response team was linked to a 30 percent mortality reduction.

“Providing clinicians with innovative, analytics-driven resources to help deliver the right care, in the right place, at the right time is essential in today’s healthcare environment,” said Dr. Chris DeRienzo, Chief Patient Safety Officer at Mission Health. “We believe our partnership with PeraHealth will enhance communication among caregivers, especially during care transitions, and deliver new methods of reducing preventable harm to our patients through machine learning and predictive analytics.”

Patients frequently exhibit subtle warning signs in the hours and days before experiencing life-threatening health problems. Considering the average five-day hospital stay includes at least 24 patient handoffs, these signs can easily be missed during department transfers and shift changes, increasing the potential for unnecessary patient harm and costs.

“Detecting potential patient deterioration is extremely challenging for any care team,” said PeraHealth CEO Stephanie Alexander. “By clearly trending a full picture of patient condition in real-time, PeraHealth solutions alert clinicians earlier to subtle health issues, which can increase the likelihood of successful intervention. We are honored to partner with Mission Health to support their use of innovative analytics to provide high value patient care.”

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BayCare Health System Recognized for Achievement in Electronic Medical Record Adoption by Leading Global Organization

BayCare Health System's progress in adopting an electronic medical records (EMR) system was recognized by the Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society (HIMSS), a global organization known for thought leadership on improving health care through information technology (IT).

Electronic medical record systems can improve patient care, increase patient safety, enhance medication safety and increase efficiency. BayCare Health System reached Stage 6 of 7 in the EMR Adoption Model developed by HIMSS Analytics, a non-profit subsidiary of HIMSS, that collects and analyzes health care data. The adoption model identifies and scores hospitals using an eight-step scale (0-7) that charts the path to a fully paperless environment. Less than 20 percent of U.S. hospitals and health systems tracked by HIMSS Analytics have reached Stage 6 as they convert to a fully automated/paperless medical records system. The ten BayCare hospitals recognized join only three others in the Tampa Bay area that have achieved this milestone.

BayCare Vice President and Chief Information Officer Timothy Thompson commented, "BayCare's IT strategy has been focused on providing a better care environment for our patients through meaningful information. This recognition by HIMSS validates our leadership position in information technology, not just in Florida but across the U.S. Our achievement enables us to offer health care providers better access to important health information. It also puts relevant information at our patients' fingertips through the MyBayCare.org portal."

Stage 6 hospitals have achieved a significant advancement in their IT capabilities that positions them to successfully address many of the current industry transformations, such as meaningful use criteria in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act; claims attachments for the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act; pay for performance; and government quality reporting programs.

The BayCare facilities recognized for reaching Stage 6 are Mease Countryside, Mease Dunedin, Morton Plant, Morton Plant North Bay, St. Anthony's, St. Joseph's, St. Joseph's Children's, St. Joseph's Hospital-North, St. Joseph's Women's and South Florida Baptist.

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A Proposal To Increase EHR Satisfaction Using Education

A recent study presented at the 2013 HIMSS conference revealed through the survey of 4,279 clinicians that EHR satisfaction has declined from 39% in 2010 to 27% in 2012.

While many organizations and publications have speculated about what has caused the decrease in satisfaction, I’d like to suggest we dedicate our resources to solving the problem instead of simply discussing the causes. Like so many transitions in the past, I wonder if the solution could simply be a matter of education? The study cited that the number of clinicians using EHRs who claimed to be “very dissatisfied” increased by 10% during those two years. This begs the question, are all users dissatisfied with their specific program, or may the dissatisfaction be caused by change itself? After all, physicians and nurses are being forced to change a long standing practice of paper charting.

According to the Pew Research Center’s Internet and American Life Project 20% of Americans did not use the internet and 13% did not have access to a computer in 2010. Outside of those numbers there are many medical professionals who are simply uncomfortable with computers or do not have strong typing skills. If a nurse is learning how to navigate a keyboard while simultaneously having to learn a system, it’s not surprising that he or she may be dissatisfied with the change. The disruption in workflow could be greatly improved by t