Napier Healthcare Wins Promising Healthcare IT Company of the Year 2013 Award from Frost & Sullivan Singapore

Napier Healthcare, a leading healthcare technology and services provider, today announced that it has been awarded the 2013 Promising Healthcare IT Company of the Year by Frost and Sullivan.

Frost & Sullivan Singapore Excellence Awards recognise companies that have pushed the boundaries of excellence to rise above the competition and demonstrate outstanding performance in the Singapore market. The award positions Napier Healthcare as a rising star in the healthcare sector for consistently offering global standard solutions that improve the quality, safety and service delivery of patient care.

“Napier Healthcare is awarded for its excellent performance as a total solutions provider with solutions spanning tertiary, secondary and primary care to urban, rural and home care. Napier also emphasises on regulatory compliance to provide customers with global standard solutions,” said Natasha Gulati, Senior Industry Analyst, Asia Pacific Health Care Practice, Frost & Sullivan.

Established in the late 90s, Napier Healthcare employs more than 270 healthcare and technology professionals with deep domain expertise. The company’s IT solutions are collaboratively developed with extensive inputs from industry veterans, clinicians, medical authorities and patients to meet the needs of small, mid-sized, and large private and public sector hospitals. Together with leading IT companies including Microsoft, IBM and HP, Napier Healthcare provides technology, infrastructure implementation and service support along with extensive training. Headquartered in Singapore, Napier has presence in USA, India, Africa, and the Middle East.

“The award underscores our commitment to innovate and lead in healthcare management systems and solutions,” said Karthik Tirupathi, CEO of Napier Healthcare. “Napier Healthcare is well positioned to drive technology adoption across the healthcare delivery value chain to benefit hospitals and patients. For example, the use of cloud and mobile platforms by Napier delivers significant value to the stakeholders of the healthcare industry.”

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A Proposal To Increase EHR Satisfaction Using Education

A recent study presented at the 2013 HIMSS conference revealed through the survey of 4,279 clinicians that EHR satisfaction has declined from 39% in 2010 to 27% in 2012.

While many organizations and publications have speculated about what has caused the decrease in satisfaction, I’d like to suggest we dedicate our resources to solving the problem instead of simply discussing the causes. Like so many transitions in the past, I wonder if the solution could simply be a matter of education? The study cited that the number of clinicians using EHRs who claimed to be “very dissatisfied” increased by 10% during those two years. This begs the question, are all users dissatisfied with their specific program, or may the dissatisfaction be caused by change itself? After all, physicians and nurses are being forced to change a long standing practice of paper charting.

According to the Pew Research Center’s Internet and American Life Project 20% of Americans did not use the internet and 13% did not have access to a computer in 2010. Outside of those numbers there are many medical professionals who are simply uncomfortable with computers or do not have strong typing skills. If a nurse is learning how to navigate a keyboard while simultaneously having to learn a system, it’s not surprising that he or she may be dissatisfied with the change. The disruption in workflow could be greatly improved by teaching nurses and doctors how to integrate EHRs into their daily tasks while still in the classroom.

Academic electronic health records programs, like EHR Tutor, allow students to gain exposure to EHRs before entering the workplace. Learning how to use electronic charting while still learning how to do the basics of their job, teaches students to be just as comfortable with a computer as they would be with a pen and piece of paper. This is something that may help ease the transition to electronic charting in the future.

In addition to being generally dissatisfied, the number of users dissatisfied with the “features and functionality” of their EHR system increased from 51% to 61%. One pain point seemed to be the fact that the features and functionality in many EHRs do not align well enough with clinicians’ workflow. Workflow can be determined by meetings with key stakeholders, shadowing medical personnel during their workday and conversations with designated doctor or nurse champions. The process works best when input from the people who will be using the system is carefully considered and fully utilized. However, improving workflows will not solve the entire problem.

For example, let us examine a problem like “alert fatigue”. In many systems, alerts pop up with warnings about drugs that may be unnecessary or elementary for a prescribing physician, or with a warning that a field is missing data that may not be relevant to the patient. An alert may also appear after a particular issue has been handled. While the alerts may seem logical to a programmer, they don’t necessarily make sense in the field. Thankfully, there are more and more schools offering courses on healthcare technology, which provide a foundation of knowledge for future developers and analysts.

Centers like the Training Hub for Operative Technologies in Healthcare at Imperial College in London offer full programs dedicated to healthcare technology. For current developers, Coursera.org offers free courses including “Health Informatics in the Cloud”, “Interprofessional Healthcare Informatics” and “Healthcare Innovation and Entrepreneurship”, all of which examine the real life work of medical professionals in relation to the technology they use. This is a knowledge set that is absolutely necessary for a programmer trying to design a system for those very people. By having companies sponsor those classes or conversations, we would open the lines of communication and enhance the education of program developers.

Along with a decrease in satisfaction regarding features and functionality, the amount of clinicians who said they would not purchase their current EHR system again if given the chance increased from 25% to 38%. This cannot be solely the fault of developers; some of the onus must fall on consumers themselves. Instead of hearing the lament, “If only I would have known…” after an EHR implementation, we can begin by making sure medical offices do know what they are getting with any particular system and what they should expect when shopping for an EHR. Educating consumers is imperative. For example, the level of computer skills and familiarity with technology needed when using different programs may be a huge factor for a practice with less computer savvy practitioners.

Reading the reviews on EHRCompare.com quickly revealed that AdvancedEMR can be difficult to set up and implement for less technologically inclined staff, whereas Practice Fusion seems to be less customizable, but easier to use (based on user reviews alone). Using EHRCompare to research multiple EHRs, a user can search by specialty, setting, and hosting preference. Then, all applicable EHRs will appear with an overview of features along with user reviews. That information not only gives consumers a great place to start, it teaches them what questions to ask and what to look for. What are some pain points a consumer may not have thought of? How do the program specs translate to office usage?

Another great resource is the Health IT government website which has a full list of all certified EHR systems: http://oncchpl.force.com/ehrcert/CHPLHome. It has a large checklist of features for each product, allowing consumers to see, at a glance, what is available and what is missing. That way, consumers know all the details even if the EHR sales rep did not disclose them all. Knowing what to look for can help buyers purchase the best system for their particular practice.

Overall, any change in procedure involves a long, arduous education process. While there are technical problems to overcome in the present, many problems can be prevented with simple education in the future. Using the resources available we can make sure new medical professionals, EHR programmers and consumers all have access to the best resources and knowledge base possible. This is something that can only lead to improvement.

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US Healthcare IT Market Outlook to 2017

The U.S. Healthcare IT market has been growing rapidly and offering immense opportunities for players involved in the business.

The market is performing on the back of new product introductions and evolving industry standards. With the cloud computing making a buzz, the U.S. Healthcare IT market is poised to reach new heights. Increasing acceptance of E-health and M-health among medical professionals and hospitals; growing awareness for quality among patients; active participation of players; and new government measures towards rural areas will augment the market growth.

In their latest research study, “US Healthcare IT Market Outlook to 2017”, RNCOS’ analysts have identified and deciphered the market dynamics in important segments to clearly highlight the areas offering promising possibilities for companies to boost their growth. The market is slated to grow at a CAGR of nearly 22% during 2013-2017. The tremendous growth of the market is driven by factors such as rising adoption of EHRs/EMRs, propelling E-health market and remote patient monitoring.

In the report, the U.S. healthcare IT market has been studied in its market scenario, market components, potential growth areas, and key players existing therein. For market performance analysis, the IT hardware dominates the market by acquiring a share of around 53%, followed by IT services market and IT software market.

Further, the market has been broken down into four distinct component segments while their current and future outlooks to 2017 have been analyzed. In addition, the report also covers a detailed analysis of the potential growth areas which helped in clearly identifying and highlighting the segments that offer the maximum opportunity for growth in the country.

The study further delves into the detailed description of the major players in the industry covering description of their businesses and their recent developments. This will help the reader to gain a deeper insight into each key market player. Moreover, market drivers and trends have been discussed along with regulatory frameworks to provide an understanding of the market dynamics. In a nutshell, the research provides all the prerequisite information for intending clients looking out to venture into these markets, and facilitates them to devise strategies, while going for an investment/partnership in the U.S. healthcare IT industry.

Get a copy here: http://www.reportbuyer.com/countries/north_america/usa/us_healthcare_market_outlook_2017.html#utm_source=prnewswire&utm_medium=pr&utm_campaign=e-Healthcare

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Final HHS Health IT Safety Plan issued

  • The Joint Commission to expand capacity to investigate Health IT-related events

A plan to guide health information technology (IT) activities across the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) to eliminate medical errors, protect patients, and improve the quality and efficiency of health care was issued today by HHS. The final Health IT Patient Safety Action and Surveillance Plan addresses the role of health IT within HHS’ c